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Do you know how it feels

Do you know how it feels

to work through 3 tons of meat? That is what I am busy with at the moment, and that is why I can’t post better today…

8 thoughts on “Do you know how it feels

  1. Sorry for all my vegetarian, Muslim or Jewish friends, this post is not intended to offend anyone, but is a glimpse of our culture.

    Why do we do meat processing? It it still a huge part of church culture in the rural parts of South Africa. We need a successful church fete to balance our books. It will take place on 7 September. We are a farming community. The farmers have given us 10 head of cattle, and 23 pigs this year, and we must process it into sellable packets of meat for the fete. People buy their meat like in the farmers markets in Europe. This takes place only once a year, but it really takes a lot of time and man hours to do. I will blog on the fete as it develops, as part of our local culture.

  2. Hi Mike- here in Africa we don’t have a clue what Goetta or Scrapple is/are…🙂 Fortunately we do the meat processing in an industrial equipped butchery, so no turning of that handle on the photo. It just fitted with my mood after a day of meat processing. My back really hurts tonight after lifting a lot of 40 kg crates of meat into an industrial meat grinder.

    • Scrapple, by the book, is made from all the scraps (trash meat) from a hog, then mixed with cornmeal and some spices. Normally one fries it for breakfast. Goetta, which very few people know about here in the US, is made about the same, but the binder is Oat Meal. The flavor is totally different. I’ve only found it in one recipe book, but my grandmother, with some German heritage, would make it and passed it on to my mother. I don’t have a recipe to follow, but prefer to make it by feal. I don’t use all the scrap, but instead use good pork meat, with very little fat. I discussed it back in May, 2013 on my blog. http://weaklythoughts.wordpress.com/2011/05/21/goetta-never-heard-of-it/ Without the fat and “Trash” it’s probably a bit healthier

      • Thanks Mike! Never heard of it before! Our version is Boerewors- Farmer’s Sausage, but all Saffas of whatever language knows it as Boerewors. The base of it is also some of the meat cuts that can’t sell that easily as steaks or prime stewing beef. If I am in charge, we cut out all the sinews and glands, and clumps of hard fat. We mix 2/3 beef with 1/3 pork. To that is added a mixture of spices, some brown vinegar and some worcheshire sauce. The exact mix of spices of each butcher is usually guarded with his life! All this is mixed together and then finely ground, and then stuffed into a very clean piece of pork or sheep entrails. This is delicious on a barbeque.

        If you buy it at a butcher shop, not everybody works that cleanly or ethically with their mix- it is known that a lot throws in all the less choicy bits like hearts and testicles.
        In South Africa, for it to be named Boerewors, it must contain more than 75% meat. (Ours is 99% meat and then spices!) The next step downwards in South Africa is Braaiwors (BBQ Sausage) but if you ever visit, dont eat that at all… here they use all the hard fat grounded and mixed with soja beans, with just a little bit of meat to flavour it. A cholestrol bomb and every heart specialist’s nightmare… I would not eat it, so I will not sell it to anyone…
        So what do we do with all the bits and pieces that I would not want to eat on it’s own? We grind it and sell it as pet mince. Where I am in charge of the meat section of our church fete, my rules are strict- work cleanly, and you must be happy to buy any packet of meat we offer yourself. Just an old Biblical principle- treat other people as you want to be treated yourself. I do not like to eat meat that has been worked without respect and care. So I will not sell meat that was prepared badly…

  3. I’ve used one of those type grinder, never on as much, just enough for a batch of Goetta (sort of like Scrapple – but lots better).

    They are work!

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