Honda Trail CT110 Adventures

I have NEVER in my life heard about the Honda Trail one10 bike before. Then I saw the blog of a few American friends who saw this story on the net.  They bought themselves such bikes, and is now on a road trip. I am excited to read about their adventures on their blog trialone10.com – Epic Trekkers  I have huge respect for anyone attempting to ride further than 200 km from home on any motorcycle. I would prefer to do it on at least a 650 like my Aprilia.  But these guys are traveling quite a long Californian journey on theirs.

Have you seen how many Trails can fit onto a trailer? http://trailone10.com/2013/06/

Image

They had a hard time getting all these bikes, and then getting them roadworthy again… I think it must be huge fun to do a trip like theirs, with a few good friends. This surely is taking  the road less travelled, because such small bikes becomes extremely uncomfortable on a long ride.  But in the hardships such good camaraderie is built. Experiences of hardship shared forges strong bonds of friendship, ass all combat veterans can also testify.

But I thought I have never seen such a bike in South Africa before. Then, yesterday, I took my wife to a coffee shop between our town and the next. And as I walked around to the rustic bathrooms, this is what I saw: Image

I have never seen one before in South Africa! (Maybe I haven’t looked- I think maybe our Post Office also had some… I never really cared about those kind of bikes…)

Wikipedia has this to say about the CT 110:

The Honda CT110 is a small motorcycle manufactured by Honda from 1980 to the present day and sold in various parts of the world. This bike has sold well worldwide[1] and has a faithful following to this day.[2] The CT110 replaced the CT90, which was essentially the same machine.

The CT110 in its classic form is a 105cc 4-stroke air-cooled single cylinder engine with a four-speed transmission and an automatic clutch. That coupled with a roughly 2:1 ratio gear reduction box known as the dual range subtransmission which switched into operation using a small lever under the transmission case and allowed the CT to climb steep slopes with no difficulty. The cylinder was nearly horizontal in the step-through tube/stamping frame. CT110s are well regarded for their extreme reliability, economy and ease of operation. The clutchless four speed transmission (centrifugal clutch) does not require a clutch lever. In Australia and New Zealand the freeing of the left hand of the rider makes mail delivery easier for “posties”

The Specs on these bikes I found in Australia at APB Auto:

Honda CT110

Manufacturer  –   Honda

Also called ‘Postie bike’ in Australia and New Zealand

 Engine  –  105 cc air-cooled single-cylinder

Power  – 5kW (7.6 hp) @ 7,500 rpm

Torque  –  0.85 kg-m @ 6,000 rpm

Transmission  – auto-clutch four-speed, with or without a dual range subtransmission

Wheelbase  –  1.220 m

Dimensions  –  L 1.905 m

W  –  0.755 m

H  –  1.060

Seat height  –   .770 m

Weight  –  87 kg (192 lb) (dry)  92 kg (203 lb) (wet)

 Fuel capacity  –  5.5 l (1.452 g)

Fuel consumption  –  60 km/l (1.6 litres per 100 km) @ 50 km/h

(140m/g @ 31.1 m/h)

Turning radius  –  1.8

Related  –   Honda CT90

The Honda CT 110 is a small motorcycle manufactured by Honda from 1980 to the present day and sold in various parts of the world.

Perhaps one of Honda’s hidden success stories, this bike has sold well worldwide and has a faithful following to this day.

The CT 110 replaced the CT90, which was essentially the same machine.

The CT110 in it’s classic form is a 105cc 4-stroke air cooled single with a four-speed transmission and an automatic clutch, coupled with a roughly 2:1 ratio gear reduction box known as the dual range subtransmission which switched into operation using a small lever under the transmission case and allowed the CT to climb steep slopes with no difficulty.

The cylinder was nearly horizontal in the step-through tube / stamping frame.

CT 110’s are well regarded for their extreme reliability, economy and ease of operation.

The clutchless four speed transmission ( centrifugal clutch ) does not require a clutch lever.

In Australia and New Zealand, the freeing of the left hand of the rider makes mail delivery easier for “POSTIES”.

In the United States the 1980 model of CT 110 lacked the dual range sub-transmission, but that feature returned in following years, the motorcycle was imported from 1980 to 1986.

It is still in production and sold in other countries around the world, most notably Australia and New Zealand, where it is known as a ” Postie Bike ” due to it’s use by Australia Post and New Zealand Post as a delivery bike, without the dual range sub-transmission.

In Australia this also makes them the “HIGHEST SELLING”Motorcycle in the country.

A slightly modified version, the CT110 AG, is sold for agricultural use.

The CT 110AG has recently become road-registerable in Australia ( 2009 ), but however has been road-registerable in New Zealand for some time.

Apart from the Australian market, large numbers of CT 110 and CT 90 models were also brought to Tanzania in east Africa, where many are still in use today.

Among the original users was Danish aid organisation Danida.

During the late 1970’s and 1980’s they were the standard issue

motorcycle for volunteers.

 SOME CLASSIC CT 110 POSTIE BIKES

 

_______________________________________________________________________

A VERY TIDY STREET BIKE

HANG – ON THAT’S NOT STOCK STANDARD

________________________________________________________________________

SPEED RACER

To see what our friends of California are doing today- they are on their way on the first leg around Provo, California… 

Touring with 5 kW! Respect, guys!

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2 thoughts on “Honda Trail CT110 Adventures

  1. The Rider’s Cape to Cairo Challenge!! Another Bucket List dream??

    OK… Let’s be realistic… Cape Town to the Limpopo?? How’s that sound on a CT 110?? 😉 Do it as a sponsored challenge… raise funds for a charity?? The homeless?

    • Hi AJ! Nee wat, ek het nie een van hulle nie, was net gefassineer deur die groepie ouens in Amerika wat so ver ry op hulle s’n. Maar ek gaan in MAart af Kaap toe, eers die Argus, en dan Word Riders 2014 twee weke later- moet nog kies watter een van die twee gaan ek langpad vat!

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